Story of a Startup: A Maid with income of $150,000/anum

I recently read a story of a startup on Neil’s QuickSprout blog, a maid who earn $150,000 per year. Lets read how he does!

Last month I ran into a Quick Sprout reader at the Entrepreneur Magazine conference in Miami. Every time I meet a Quick Sprout reader, the first thing I ask is:

What do you do?

Within seconds Juan got into his life story and explained how he kind is a maid, but makes $150,000 a year. And once I heard $150,000, I instantly thought how does a maid make that much money?

Naturally I started to dig deeper and I realized that he had an amazing life story that I have to share with all of you. So here goes…

Coming to America

Juan was born in Colombia and when he was young he dreamed of being an automotive engineer. But he couldn’t find too many colleges in Colombia that specialized in automotive engineering so he decided to look for colleges in other countries.

He found a lot of good schools in the U.S. so he applied to them. Within months he got accepted to a school in Texas and relocated.

During his first year he learned everything about cars. And by the second year, he was able to take apart and put back together a car. According to one of his professors, he was on track to being a great engineer.

But he ran into one big problem…

During his second year at the university he found out from the school that they lost his immigration paper work. They searched hard to find it and they tried to resolve the issue with the government, but they were unable to do so.

Because Juan wanted to stay in the U.S., this meant that he had to stay as an illegal immigrant.

A tough life

Although Juan had a girlfriend who was a citizen, and they were already planning on getting married, he didn’t want to rush things. He couldn’t get a normal job due to his illegal status, so he had to take side jobs to make a living.

He quickly saw how many immigrants were standing outside of local hardware stores. He noticed how competitive it was and felt that he could do better because he had a special skill… he was good with cars.

At that point it hit him that he should help people fix their cars. So instead of standing outside of Home Depot, he stood outside of AutoZone.

When someone walked out with car parts, he offered to fix their car for them right then and there in the parking lot. He did it for $10 to $20. For example, if you walked out of AutoZone with a pair of break pads, he would offer to replace them for you for $10.

The fight for survival

Juan wasn’t making a ton of money, but he was able to pull in anywhere from $20 to $100 a day. He wasn’t making stable income so it was impossible for him to provide for his girlfriend if they ever decided to get married. So he started to look for new ideas to make steady money.

One of his friends recommended that he start cleaning houses as you can make up to $100 a day for being a maid. He instantly latched onto the idea and started his own maid service.

He started out by cleaning his friends homes and because he was doing a good job they naturally referred him to more people. He got so busy that his girlfriend decided to join him and together they started to clean homes for a living.

Within months they got up to $3000 in monthly income and because Juan felt financially stable his girlfriend and him decided to get married.

The thirst for knowledge

Making $3000 a month isn’t bad, but it wasn’t enough for Juan. He wanted to continue learning and further his education so that he could do better in life. But there was one issue… he didn’t have enough money to go back to college.

So instead of giving up on his quest for more knowledge he started to buy audio books about entrepreneurship, marketing, and website design. He also started to read blogs like Quick Sprout and Mixergy.

From his readings he learned that the best income is passive income. And that you ideally want to figure out a way to make money even when you are sleeping. This way your income isn’t directly tied to how many hours you are working each day.

The road to entrepreneurship

The business concept that Juan came up with was to start a cleaning service that connected people with maids in their area. Kind of like Molly Maid, but instead he would focus on the Dallas Texas region.

In the first 30 days of launching it, no one came to his website and he didn’t make a dime. He actually lost money because he had to pay for hosting and wasn’t cleaning as many homes due to the amount of time it took him to create a website.

He quickly realized that he wasn’t going to be successful unless he figured out how to separate himself from the competition.

He surveyed his customer base, and saw that there was a demand for an eco-riendly maid company. People were actually willing to pay a bit more if he used products that were better for the environment.

So he decided to change the name of his maid business to Gmaids (Green Maids). Gmaids would connect people with eco-friendly maids in the Dallas Texas region.

Within a week of launching his eco-friendly site the Daily Candy picked it up and he was bombarded with new customers. If you fast-forward to a year after its launch, he hit 6 figures in yearly income getting people to subscribe to a monthly maid-cleaning program.

Growing the business

Now that Juan started to make a healthy amount of passive income from his business, he focused on growing it. From traffic acquisition strategies like search engine optimization to optimizing Gmaids for conversions by fine tuning the copy, adding video testimonials and modifying design elements.

These days Juan is looking to grow Gmaids into a million dollar company by expanding into more cities. He doesn’t know if he’ll get there, but he’ll never stop trying.

Conclusion

If you don’t have money and things aren’t going your way, it doesn’t mean you can’t be a successful entrepreneur. Juan had a lot of things going against him and he did well… he had to learn English, he didn’t have much cash, and worst of all he was an illegal immigrant.

Keep on pushing forward like Juan did and never let anything stand in your way. Yes, things won’t always go the way you want, but if you keep on trying something has to work out to your benefit.

So what do you think of Juan’s story? Do you know of any other people who went from having nothing to becoming successful?

This blog was a post by Neil Patel

How Consumers Interact With Brands on Facebook [STUDY]

People interact with their favorite brands on Facebook far more than on any other social network, according to a recent study of online consumer behavior.

The study, conducted by Constant Contact and research firm Chadwick Martin Bailey, analyzed the behavior of 1,491 consumers ages 18 and older throughout the United States and revealed a number of details about how people interact with brands on the world’s largest social network.

When it comes to “Liking” brands on Facebook, the reasons are varied, but for the most part, respondents said they “Like” a brand on Facebook because they are a customer (58%) or because they want to receive discounts and promotions (57%).

SEE ALSO: 13 Best Practices for Restaurants on Facebook Being a fan, for the most part, is a rather passive activity. A whopping 77% of consumers said they interact with brands on Facebook primarily through reading posts and updates from the brands.

A measly 17% of respondents said they interact with brands by sharing experiences and news stories with others about the brand, and only 13% of respondents said they post updates about brands that they Like.

The study also pointed to a number of encouraging stats for businesses, including:

  • 56% of consumers said they are more likely to recommend a brand to a friend after becoming a fan on Facebook
  • 51% of consumers said they are more likely to buy a product since becoming a fan on Facebook
  • 78% of consumers who “Like” brands on Facebook said they “Like” fewer than ten brands

Contrary to another study published in February that stated that 81% of consumers have either “unliked” or removed a company’s posts from their Facebook News Feed, this study reports that 76% of consumers said they have never “unliked” a brand on Facebook.

For brands looking to make the biggest impact on Facebook, it is essential to share compelling content, minimize marketing messages and refrain from overwhelming readers with too frequent updates.

View the complete study here:

How Consumers Interact With Brands on Facebook [STUDY].

An article posted by Mashable

21 Things for those who Starting their own Business

Starting A Business

Presentation Transcript:

21 Things We’reLearning At Fab.com 10-12-11

  • 130 Days Ago Fab.com Didn’t Even Exist.
  • Now, We’ve Got 750,000 Members, 3M Visits/ Month, $100K sales days.
  • It’s Humbling.
  • It’s Exciting.
  • It’s Challenging. We never imagined we’d grow so fast.
  • Here are 21 Things We’re Learning As We Go:
  1. Do 1 Thing. Find 1 thing you can do really well and focus entirely on that one thing.
  2. Say No! Don’t do any thing else except for yourone thing. Say no to meetings, ideas, proposal, b.s., outside of your core 1 thing.
  3. It’s Always All About The Product. Our virtual products (website & apps) and physical products (design objects) must delight every day.
  4. Keep it Interesting. No one comes back to check out the same thing every day. Keep it fresh, exciting, and unpredictable.
  5. Make People Smile. We’re not in the design sales business, we’re in the design inspiration business. Inspire people and the sales will come.
  6. Service Matters More Than Sales. Sales go up and down. Service lasts forever.
  7. Do Whatever It Takes To Make Customers Happy. Get it right and they’ll tell their friends. Get it wrong and they’ll tell the entire world.
  8. Make Mistakes Take risks. Move fast. Learn faster.
  9. Recover Quickly.
  10. Apologize. Own your screw-ups.
  11. Strive to Have Your Customers LOVE Every Interaction With Your Company. Push your team to live this dream.
  12. Celebrate Your Challenges. Force the team to focus on why you suck, even while you’re growing.
  13. Don’t Focus Too Much OnThe Vision. Winning is all about execution.
  14. Be Transparent. The more people know, the better.
  15. Measure Everything.
  16. Grow Your People. Coach your team to scale with the opportunity.
  17. Fill Your Gaps. Bring in new talent to spur further growth.
  18. Hire Smarter. Hire people who are better at their jobs than you ever could be.
  19. Maintain Perspective Success is fleeting.
  20. Say Please & Thank You. People do things because they want to, not because they have to.
  21. Have Fun. Life’s too short to do it any other way.

How to become successful Sales Representative

Selling isn’t about Relationships, really? Ask any sales leader how selling has changed in the past decade, and you’ll hear a lot of answers but only one recurring theme: It’s a lot harder. Yet even in these difficult times, every sales organization has a few stellar performers. Who are these people? How can we bottle their magic?

To understand what sets apart this special group of sales reps, the Sales Executive Council launched a global study of sales rep productivity three years ago involving more than 6,000 reps across nearly 100 companies in multiple industries.

We now have an answer, which we’ve captured in the following three insights:

1. Every sales professional falls into one of five distinct profiles.

Quantitatively speaking, just about every B2B sales rep in the world is one of the following types, characterized by a specific set of skills and behaviors that defines the rep’s primary mode of interacting with customers:

  • Relationship Builders focus on developing strong personal and professional relationships and advocates across the customer organization. They are generous with their time, strive to meet customers’ every need, and work hard to resolve tensions in the commercial relationship.
  • Hard Workers show up early, stay late, and always go the extra mile. They’ll make more calls in an hour and conduct more visits in a week than just about anyone else on the team.
  • Lone Wolves are the deeply self-confident, the rule-breaking cowboys of the sales force who do things their way or not at all.
  • Reactive Problem Solvers are, from the customers’ standpoint, highly reliable and detail-oriented. They focus on post-sales follow-up, ensuring that service issues related to implementation and execution are addressed quickly and thoroughly.
  • Challengers use their deep understanding of their customers’ business to push their thinking and take control of the sales conversation. They’re not afraid to share even potentially controversial views and are assertive — with both their customers and bosses.

2. Challengers dramatically outperform the other profiles, particularly Relationship Builders.

When we look at average reps, we find a fairly even distribution across all five of these profiles. But while there may be five ways to be average, there’s only one way to be a star. We found that Challenger reps dominate the high-performer population, making up close to 40% of star reps in our study.

What makes the Challenger approach different?

The data tell us that these reps are defined by three key capabilities:

Challengers teach their customers. They focus the sales conversation not on features and benefits but on insight, bringing a unique (and typically provocative) perspective on the customer’s business. They come to the table with new ideas for their customers that can make money or save money — often opportunities the customer hadn’t realized even existed.

Challengers tailor their sales message to the customer They have a finely tuned sense of individual customer objectives and value drivers and use this knowledge to effectively position their sales pitch to different types of customer stakeholders within the organization.

Challengers take control of the sale. While not aggressive, they are certainly assertive. They are comfortable with tension and are unlikely to acquiesce to every customer demand. When necessary, they can press customers a bit — not just in terms of their thinking but around things like price.

We’ll discuss each of these capabilities in more depth in our upcoming posts, but just as surprising as it is that Challengers win, it’s almost more eye-opening who loses. In our study, Relationship Builders come in dead last, accounting for only 7% of all high performers.

Why is this? It’s certainly not because relationships no longer matter in B2B sales–that would be a naïve conclusion. Rather, what the data tell us is that it is the nature of the relationships that matter. Challengers win by pushing customers to think differently, using insight to create constructive tension in the sale. Relationship Builders, on the other hand, focus on relieving tension by giving in to the customer’s every demand. Where Challengers push customers outside their comfort zone, Relationship Builders are focused on being accepted into it. They focus on building strong personal relationships across the customer organization, being likable and generous with their time. The Relationship Builder adopts a service mentality. While the Challenger is focused on customer value, the Relationship Builder is more concerned with convenience. At the end of the day, a conversation with a Relationship Builder is probably professional, even enjoyable, but it isn’t as effective because it doesn’t ultimately help customers make progress against their goals.

This finding — that Challengers win and Relationship Builders lose — is one that sales leaders often find deeply troubling, because their organizations have placed by far their biggest bet on recruiting, developing, and rewarding Relationship Builders, the profile least likely to win.

Here’s how one of our members in the hospitality industry put it when he saw these results: “You know, this is really hard to look at. For the past 10 years, it’s been our explicit strategy to hire effective Relationship Builders. After all, we’re in the hospitality business. And, for a while, that approach worked well. But ever since the economy crashed, my Relationship Builders are completely lost. They can’t sell a thing. And as I look at this, now I know why.”

3. Challengers dominate the world of complex “solution-selling”

Given the first two findings, it might be reasonable to conclude that Challengers are the down-economy reps and that when things return to normal, Relationship Builders will once again prevail. But our data suggest that this is wishful thinking.

When we cut the data by complexity of sale — that is, separating out transactional, product-selling reps from complex, solution-selling reps — we find that Challengers absolutely dominate as selling gets more complex. Fully 54% of all star reps in a solution-selling environment are Challengers. At the same time, Relationship Builders fall off the map almost entirely, representing only 4% of high-performing reps in complex environments.

Put differently, Challengers win because they’ve mastered the complex sale, not because they’ve mastered a complex economy. Your very best sales reps — the ones who carried you through the downturn — aren’t just the top performers of today but the top performers of tomorrow, as they are far better able to drive sales and deliver customer value in any kind of economic environment. For any company on a journey from selling products to selling solutions — which is a migration that more than 75% of the companies I work with say they are pursuing — the Challenger selling approach represents a dramatically improved recipe for driving top-line growth.

 

Why you should you read this article?

You should read If you;

  • are interested in making strategic sales
  • like to know what kind of sales person you need to be
  • are going to hire sales team and need to know kind of sales people your company need
  • want an insight of present sales trend and tactics
  • like to improve and update your sales strategy
  • want to be successful sales representative

 

This article is a courtesy of Harvard Business Review